Faculty News

November 29, 2017

Darden Publishing recently published a case study co-authored by Ryan Nelson and Ryan Wright. Titled “The Phoenix Project: Remediation of a Cybersecurity Crisis at the University of Virginia,” the case study was designed to facilitate discussion of how a cyberattack was remediated by a major public university. Students are challenged to think through how to best manage the remediation project, including the application of best practices such as risk management, stakeholder management, communication plans, outsourcing/procurement management, and cyberattack remediation.

November 28, 2017

Rob Patterson served on a panel titled “The Many Facets of Dallas” at the National Communication Association’s (NCA) 103rd Annual Convention, held in Dallas Nov. 16-19, 2017.  Co-sponsored by the NCA’s American Studies and Visual Communication divisions, the panel explored various Dallas sites as rhetorical artifacts (i.e., the ways they’re persuasive or are intended to impress). Panelists attempted to interpret the essences of the Dallas metropolitan area by analyzing its religious, sporting, historical, and commercial sites.

November 28, 2017

UVA’s Contemplative Sciences Center and Sally Armentrout, Marcia Pentz, David Mick, and Mark White organized the Pickard Contemplative Fellowship and Retreat for McIntire Students, an immersive weekend of learning contemplative practices at the Sevenoaks Retreat Center in Madison County, Va. Thirty-seven students attended the Oct. 13-15, 2017, retreat, which brought a different perspective to the idea of success and leadership through a variety of activities in mindfulness, meditation, group work, and reflective writing.

November 28, 2017

A study by McIntire’s Center for Business Analytics and Ipsos Public Affairs probing consumer and workplace perspectives of automation that ranged from online banking and self-driving cars to big issues like large-scale job loss, was featured in an Oct. 17, 2017, WIRED article titled “Americans Love Automation, Until It Comes for Their Jobs.” Rick Netemeyer, Ahmed Abbasi, and David Dobolyi worked closely with their Ipsos colleagues to develop a framework for analyzing automation. Using a large representative sample of the U.S. population, the results reveal a tension between automation’s many perceived consumer-side benefits and the belief by the majority of respondents that it destroys more jobs than it creates. Cliff Young, President of Ipsos Public Affairs, first presented the findings at the annual Business Analytics Colloquium held at McIntire in September 2017.

November 28, 2017

A proposal developed by Bevin Etienne, along with colleagues Christine Mahoney, Batten School Director of Social Entrepreneurship @UVA; Elgin Cleckley, School of Architecture Professor; and Wes Bellamy and Kathy Galvin, Charlottesville City Councilors, has earned $25,000 in funding through UVA’s new Flash Funding program. The team’s “New Vinegar Hill” project aims to encourage the city to use a community-driven approach for future redevelopment projects and recommends a design-thinking process to facilitate productive conversations and creative solutions to move beyond racial division toward equitable wealth building for all. Designed to provide rapid, one-time funding to small groups, the focus of the Flash Fund, offered for the first time this September, is on “Achieving the Culture and Environment We Value,” with a special emphasis on creative ideas for programming and initiatives that uproot the conscious and unconscious biases and misbeliefs that lead to racial tension. Proposals in partnership with the Charlottesville-area community are particularly encouraged.

November 28, 2017

Carrie Heilman was named UVA’s new faculty athletics representative in October 2017, succeeding Curry School of Education Professor Carolyn M. Callahan, who has served in that role since 1997. In this role, Heilman will help to ensure that the University establishes and maintains the appropriate balance between academics and intercollegiate athletics and will represent the University at meetings of the Atlantic Coast Conference and the National Collegiate Athletic Association. She will also serve as the faculty liaison between the academic enterprise and the athletics department.

November 28, 2017

Thanks to the support Amanda P. Cowen and Nicole V. Montgomery received in 2016 from the Walker Fund for Academic Excellence and the Davis R. Ledford Faculty Fellowship Fund, respectively, the Cowen and Montgomery created an experimental study exploring how the gender of a CEO affects people’s perceptions of that CEO when the organization he or she leads suffers product failure. The study investigates how those opinions then influence consumers’ willingness to purchase products from those companies in the future. Cowen and Montgomery collected responses from focus groups presented with fictional articles about corporate missteps. The stories were identical except for the name of the CEO, who was identified as either Adam Clayton or Abigail Clayton. The resulting data revealed noticeably different reactions to and judgment of the corporate leaders.

“It turns out that gender does matter, but it depends on what caused the failure,” said Cowen. The male CEO in the article suffered a stronger backlash than his female counterpart for an unintentional error—or what is sometimes called “honest incompetence.” Apologizing elicited a more severe response, and the male CEO received less criticism when denying a failure. Interestingly, the female CEO was more readily blamed when the event concerned a moral error, and consumer reaction was harsh if she denied any wrongdoing. In contrast to her male counterpart, participants tended to be more lenient if she offered an apology. The study exposes the pitfalls of stereotypes and some of the important challenges women leaders face.

“Our research is now headed toward trying to understand these different stakeholder groups and the role that gender may play in shaping their perceptions,” Montgomery said. “We hope to identify recommendations that can benefit organizations and their leaders.”

June 6, 2017

Carrie Heilman was presented with the 11th annual Faculty Recognition Award on behalf of The Order of the Claw & Dagger during the McIntire graduation ceremony May 21, 2017. The award recognized Heilman for "her strong commitment to McIntire students, her unbridled enthusiasm in the classroom, and the unparalleled amount of time that she devotes to her students outside of it."

June 6, 2017

Journal of Financial Economics, the top journal in finance and one of the top journals across all fields of economics in terms of citation impact, has awarded David C. Smith and his co-authors "Second Prize" for best corporate paper for their 2016 paper "The Ownership and Trading of Debt Claims in Chapter 11 Restructurings.” (View the citations ranking for the journal.)

May 31, 2017

Gary Ballinger discusses the impact of leadership change on businesses and the importance of being prepared for it in a May 27, 2017, Daily Progress article titled “Small Businesses Should Not Overlook Succession Planning, Locals Say.”

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